Is It Okay To Sin?

03/21/2016

Do you suppose Jesus was surprised that Judas was stealing from the treasury?

Or do you think He knew it all along?

I’m pretty sure He knew.

So… let’s say Jesus did know. Why didn’t he stop Judas from stealing? Isn’t that one of the profound mysteries of our life?

Of all our lives?

Does Jesus know that you sin? Or are you doing a better job of hiding it from Him?

Why doesn’t He prevent you from doing it?

Same profound mystery.

God gave each of us free will. Along with Original Sin.

Oh, great… so He punishes us by making us sinful.

No. He gave us freedom of choice. Freedom to choose right or wrong. So we control our own eternal destiny.

But wait. If we’re born with Original Sin, aren’t we doomed to hell right off the bat?

Again, no. Because we are free to choose right from wrong.

Original Sin means we have the propensity to sin.

Original Sin means we are not perfect.

Only our Heavenly Father is perfect.

Original Sin means we are likely to suffer at the hands of other human beings or some other force of nature.

Original Sin means we are subject to the risks of the Earth.

Original Sin means we need to be perfected.

Original Sin means we have choices to make which will either draw us closer to God and heaven or separate us farther from Him.

Bottom line: Jesus knows that we sin. And he accepts that. Because we are human.

That doesn’t mean our sins are acceptable.

But it does make us eligible to receive God’s endless mercy.

And that’s what our journey through life, this profound mystery that’s unique to each person, teaches us.

We continue toward Calvary. Happy Monday of Holy Week.

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Thanks for taking some of your precious time today to read and listen to my thoughts. My commitment during Lent 2016 is to post a daily video reflection to help you and me on our walk through the season and toward Easter Sunday. I will also explore other matters of faith and also health and fitness to keep us fit for the journey. Click here for my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/davekwiecinski

I appreciate your help and encouragement. Please let me know how I can help you. This is something I’ve been called to do for some time. I’m finally embracing it. Father, forgive me for procrastinating.

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Homosexuality, Divorce, Mortal Sin and Holy Communion

10/17/2015

Archbishop Blaise Cupich of the Archdiocese of Chicago recently suggested that conscience decides who can receive Holy Communion. Speaking specifically about divorced and civilly remarried Roman Catholics, Archbishop Cupich said they must “come to a decision in good conscience” and that the job of the Church is is to “help them move forward and to respect that.”

Quoting from the same article in the National Catholic Register referenced above:

Asked if he would likewise accompany homosexual couples into receiving the sacraments according to their conscience, Archbishop Cupich replied: “Gay people are human beings, too, they have a conscience and my role as a pastor is to help them to discern what the will of God is by looking at the objective moral teaching of the Church.”

But he added that “at the same time,” his role as a pastor is to help them “through a period of discernment, to understand what God is calling them to at that point, so it’s for everybody.”

His comments have touched off a firestorm among Roman Catholics. In the comments on this article, one reader suggested that this is heresy. Most of the comments I read were extremely critical of the Archbishop.

I’m not sure how a priest or bishop — or even Pope Francis — is supposed to police this. Their role is not to play God. Each of us, no matter our role in the church, ordained or laity, is to follow the teachings of the Church.

But we’re not supposed to judge each other.

Do we have a responsibility to point out faults or errors in thinking? Yes. But we’ve got to be careful that we don’t play God.

Our role is to exercise mercy.

I voiced my own opinion in the comments section of the National Catholic Register article.

May I take a slightly contrarian view of Archbishop Cupich’s comments? Is he welcoming these groups into full communion? Or is he suggesting that he will not refuse them Holy Communion if they come to the front of church to receive it?

The reception of Holy Communion does not relieve me of my responsibility for my actions. As a sinner who has ignorantly gone to Holy Communion while in mortal sin, thinking that this somehow brought me into grace with God the Father, I now understand that reception of Holy Communion at that time in my life only magnified my state of sinfulness and grievously profaned the Eucharist.

Receiving Holy Communion while in a state of mortal sin only enhances my immorality. Let’s face it, there’s no litmus test for any of us on our way to the altar to receive our Lord and Savior. Whether or not we are aware of the grave consequences of our actions, our reception of the Eucharist only magnifies our present state in the eyes of the Father.

Those of you who know me or put up with my (… shall we say…) musings on Facebook know that I have my differences of opinion with some of the things Pope Francis has had to say when he comments on most things political. And you also know that I am an apologist for Catholicism and faithfully believe in the infallibility of the Holy Catholic Church.

This is not the same.

Comments?

20140827_152814


How Can We Have Mercy on Mass Murderers?

09/11/2015

September 11.

A day of reflection for millions of Americans since the dark events of this day in 2001. Thousands of Americans were murdered by a handful of men.

A good day to reflect on something so incredibly more important and powerful than that, however, as odd as that may seem.

Humankind has been murdering and exterminating humankind for centuries. The Romans enjoyed serving Christians for lunch to wild animals. The Nazis exterminated millions of Jews. The Communist Soviet Union exterminated millions of its own citizens.

I could continue, citing other examples, but that’s not the point.

And now Planned Parenthood, exposed not only as an abortion mill, but as a cold, calculating trafficker of “fetal tissue.” We all know what that really means.

But let’s not debate the right or the wrong of it.

I’m serious.

That’s not what this post is about.

Death is death. Death is final.

Yes, tortuous death is not the same as dying peacefully in the presence of loving family and friends in the comfort of one’s bed. Or falling asleep, only to die in one’s sleep, never having a chance to say goodbye or wrap up those nasty loose ends.

Death is still death.

And what happens after death?

You know that I’m a faithful Catholic. I believe that we encounter our Creator. We encounter God.

And our eternal fate is presented to us.

Did we persevere to the end? Did we acknowledge our sinfulness and acknowledge Jesus as our Savior?

We can get into specifics and semantics about needing to be saved… about needing or not needing works to save us…

… but not here.

That’s not the point of this post.

What happens after death?

What happens to the murdered Syrian Christian sacrificed at the hands of a brutal member if ISIS?

What happens to the people crushed under the weight of the collapsing World Trade Center towers?

What happens to the suicide murderers?

The same darn thing.

We all encounter God. And we account for our lives.

We make choices while we live.

We also have a choice when we die.

Will we acknowledge that Jesus Christ came to save us and will we accept His saving help?

Will we turn our backs on the mercy of God and not accept His control over our eternity?

Do you even believe it?

You also know that I am an avid proponent of the devotion of St. Faustina Kowalska and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy.

Jesus appeared to St. Faustina. It’s been documented. Read about it here.

Jesus gave the young nun specific instructions on living a life of mercy.

“I demand20140827_152814 from you deeds of mercy, which are to arise out of love for Me. You are to show mercy to your neighbors always and everywhere. You must not shrink from this or try to excuse or absolve yourself from it. 

“I am giving you three ways of exercising mercy toward your neighbor: the first — by deed, the second — by word, the third — by prayer.

“In these three degrees is contained the fullness of mercy, and it is an unquestionable proof of love for Me. By this means a soul glorifies and pays reverence to My mercy.” (Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska, 742).

 

Wow….

No excuses.

I’m not a big fan of many politicians, pop culture icons, and others that I think cause great distress for our country. Doesn’t matter. I owe them mercy.

“My love and mercy knows no bounds.” (Diary, 718)

How can I express love for those who perpetrated 9/11? I can’t. Doesn’t matter. I owe them mercy.

“The greater the sinner, the greater the right he has to My mercy.” (Diary, 723)

How can we have mercy on mass murderers?

It’s easy.

“Beg for mercy for the whole world.” (Diary, 570)

Oh… it may not be easy. But if we focus our hearts on Jesus, He will make it easy to pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet.

“Today Jesus said to me…

‘Call upon My mercy on behalf of sinners; I desire their salvation. When you say this prayer, with a contrite heart and with faith on behalf of some sinner, I will give him the grace of conversion.

‘This is the prayer:  O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fount of Mercy for us, I trust in You.’ (Diary, 186, 187)

I hope you will tell me how you feel about this subject. Can you have mercy on those who hate you? On those who annoy you? On someone who tortured someone you love?

Can I help you?

Ask me.

 


Thanks for taking some of your precious time today to read my thoughts. My intention is to post a brief, daily meditation based on the readings from the day’s Catholic liturgy. I would appreciate your help and encouragement. This is something I’ve been called to do for some time. I’m finally embracing it. Father, forgive me for procrastinating. And for still not posting a meditation daily.

This is where Kit Kat is buried. R.I.P. little buddy.


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