What Are You Looking For?

01/05/2016

As we wind our way through the Christmas season and toward the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord…

As we contemplate the year that has passed and anticipate the year to come…

Recall the very first words Jesus speaks in the Gospel of John…

“What are you looking for?”

Jesus speaks these words to Andrew and John. They follow Him after John the Baptist identifies Jesus as “the Lamb of God.”

In another translation, Jesus asks “What do you want?”

So, I’m asking…

What are you looking for this year? What do you want?

What are you willing to do to get it?

What are you willing to sacrifice?

Andrew and John answer Jesus by asking him where He is staying. Jesus said “Come, and you will see.”

Are you willing to follow? Are you willing to take a risk?

What are you looking for? What do you want?

How important is it to you?

Five minutes. Take five minutes to contemplate your answers.

—————————————-

Thanks for taking some of your precious time today to read my thoughts. My intention is to post regularly and to include comments on the Daily Liturgy. I will also explore other matters of faith that catch my attention. I have begun posting video reflections (and other stuff) on YouTube. Click here to take a gander: https://www.youtube.com/user/davekwiecinski

I would appreciate your help and encouragement. This is something I’ve been called to do for some time. I’m finally embracing it. Father, forgive me for procrastinating.

cropped-img_0673.jpg

Advertisements

Déjà vu All Over Again

05/01/2015

Interesting juxtaposition in today’s Daily Mass readings. In the First Reading, from the Acts of the Apostles (Acts 13:13-25), Paul recounts the royal lineage of the Hebrews and leads all the way up to John the Baptist foretelling the coming of Jesus.

Historically, that would be just prior to Jesus commencing his public ministry.

The Gospel (John 13:16-20) jumps forward to Holy Thursday, the very end of Jesus’ public ministry. Jesus is washing the disciples’ feet.

We have a symbolic cleansing in the Jordan by John. Not a true baptism, of course, because this is before Jesus had instituted the sacrament. And we have symbolic cleansing by sacrificial death in the Gospel.

We’re halfway through the Easter season and we’re already again recalling the death of Christ?

Folks, we do that every single day.

Or at least, we should be.

You never cease to gather a people to Yourself, so that from the rising of the sun to its setting a pure sacrifice may be offered to Your name. – from Eucharistic Prayer No. 3, Third Edition of the Roman Missal

Every single day.

So many times, each day, “from east to west,” a priest hoists a piece of bread heavenward, invokes the words of Jesus Christ at the Last Supper, and Jesus Christ Himself transubstantiates the earthly nourishment into the Divine.

What was that?

He changes the bread into His body.

Likewise, he changes the wine into His blood.

Déjà vu. All over again.

This is what makes the celebration of the Mass so beautiful, so powerful, so vital.

For the last two thousand years, we have recalled the death of our Lord, Jesus Christ. And we continue to

Do this in memory of me.

 

—————————————-

Thanks for taking some of your precious time today to read my thoughts. My intention, beginning Friday, April 17, 2015, is to post a brief, daily meditation based on the readings from the day’s Catholic liturgy. I would appreciate your help and encouragement. This is something I’ve been called to do for some time. I’m finally embracing it. Father, forgive me for procrastinating.

 

cropped-img_0673.jpg


%d bloggers like this: